The book is very thorough and comprehensive. It includes all the topics typically taught in a general chemistry class.read more


Comprehensivenessrating:5see less

The book is very thorough and comprehensive. It includes all the topics typically taught in a general chemistry class.

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Content Accuracyrating:5

The content is very accurate and factually correct.

Relevance/Longevityrating:5

The contents are up-to-date. I particularly like that the real-life examples given in the textbook, such as cooking, chemistry of a smart phone, etc.. Those examples are likely to be highly relevant to students.

Clarityrating:5

The text is very clear.

Consistencyrating:5

Terminology and framework are both very consistent throughout the book.

Modularityrating:4

Overall, the textbook is very easily divisible into smaller reading sections, especially since they have a table of contents list that is clickable and can lead you to various different sections of the book. I did have a few minor problems: first, I had was that a few of the contents should have been under the same topic, but are scattered under different chapters. For example, the formula and molecular mass should be included in the same chapter as moles and molar mass, but they are covered in a much later chapter; second, some very important topics in chemistry, such as moles and net ionic equations, are included in the book but not in the table of contents, so it took me a while to find them, and I imagine that if I were to assign reading on those topics for my students, it would be difficult for them to find those topics, too. I suggest that the authors include at least the key topics in chemistry in the table of contents.

Organization/Structure/Flowrating:3

Overall, the book is well organized, and flows logically. However, there are several parts of the book that I would suggest the authors to rearrange. For example, molecular and formula masses should be in the same topic as chemical formula and taught before moles and molar mass because they are related; the periodic table, and the related knowledge like atomic number and groups of elements should be taught much earlier in the book, even before the chemical formulas; the net ionic equation should be taught after solubility and acid/base so students would understand why some compounds dissociate into ions while others do not; kinetics should be taught before equilibrium so that students understand that at equilibrium, the forward and reverse rates are equal; molarity should be under the topic "solutions".

Interfacerating:4

It is easy to navigate, especially with the "table of contents" and the feature to search for key words. The quality of the images are high, but more images can be included. For example, it would be helpful and easier for students to read if images of every electron-group and molecular geometries are included when talking about VSEPR theory.

Grammatical Errorsrating:5

There is no grammatical errors.

Cultural Relevancerating:2

Thank you for including "portrait of a chemist", and for talking about the contribution by Rosalind Franklin to the DNA structure. However, pretty much all of the chemists included are US/European based, and most are white/"white-passing". I would like to see more inclusion of people from, for example, Asian, African, or Latin American countries, and people from a more diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds, which will be a better reflection of students in a general chemistry class.

Comments

Overall, this is a good book for teaching general chemistry with an atoms first approach. I am considering adopting this textbook for my general chemistry class. However, I may make a few minor changes or rearrange some topics if I use this textbook.


The book covers all areas of a typical general chemistry course. An index, glossary, and appendices are included in the book. They are thorough, easy to navigate, and provide the necessary information needed for students to be successful.read more


Comprehensivenessrating:5see less

The book covers all areas of a typical general chemistry course. An index, glossary, and appendices are included in the book. They are thorough, easy to navigate, and provide the necessary information needed for students to be successful.

Content Accuracyrating:5

No errors in calculations, units, or diagrams were noted.

Relevance/Longevityrating:4

The book seems to be relevant. I didn't notice any out of date information, nor did I see topics that were too new for students to fully understand. There seems to be a balance.

Clarityrating:5

The language of the book is easy to understand.

Consistencyrating:5

All terminology is consistent.

Modularityrating:4

The book has plenty of headers, diagrams, charts, and pictures to keep readers engaged and information organized. I do wish there was a more color on the pages; it may be dull to some.

Organization/Structure/Flowrating:5

The sequence of topics in the book is traditional for an atoms first approach.

Interfacerating:5

There are no interface issues.

Grammatical Errorsrating:5

There are no grammatical errors.

Cultural Relevancerating:5

I did not see any insensitive or offensive material.

Comments

This is a great source for students that do not have a strong chemistry background. There are examples with explanations and calculations, charts, and diagrams that help guide a student along. The additional sections in the back of the book provide ample information such as constants, values, and definitions to make the material clearer. If the book had more color, it would be near perfect. I'm looking to incorporate this book into my general chemistry courses.


This book covers the basic principles of chemistry in a mostly comprehensive way. The only thing I would note is that some concepts are covered in a bit too much detail for the point at which the concept would be introduced in the course (e.g....read more


Comprehensivenessrating:3see less

This book covers the basic principles of chemistry in a mostly comprehensive way. The only thing I would note is that some concepts are covered in a bit too much detail for the point at which the concept would be introduced in the course (e.g. titrations in Ch.7) and some concepts feel covered a bit too sparsely (e.g. combustion analysis doesn't include hydrocarbons with heteroatoms). Specifically, Ch.3 is a critical place for depth of explanation because this is an atom's first text, but there are several places where the explanations are lacking.

Content Accuracyrating:4

The book seems appropriately error free, accurate and unbiased. Conventionally published works are known to also have printed errors and inaccuracies here and there and I think this text is comparable to those texts.

Relevance/Longevityrating:4

This text does seem up-to-date in a way that seems like it will not quickly become obsolete. I think that is partially a function of the subject matter (general chemistry), since the principles of chemical behavior at the general chemistry level are pretty well-established and it would be difficult to include information from the primary literature without losing the students. However, I also think that the author's did a nice job of keeping true to the idea that science is ever-changing, such that updates could be made easily.

Clarityrating:4

I think the author's did a nice job with the clarity of their writing style. Most concepts are presented clearly and there are only a few places where I have noticed big jumps in logic that may confuse students. The prose is written at an appropriate level for first/second year undergraduates.

Consistencyrating:4

I have not noticed any internal inconsistencies in terminology. I have noticed a few small places where it seems like that materials is fractured and presented in chunks at different places in the text, which sometimes feels like the student's could view it as slightly choppy (if they notice_. However, from an instructor standpoint, the decisions made by the authors in the places where these ideas are split seem logical and well-founded.

Modularityrating:5

I have found this text to be very modular and amenable to reorganization where necessary. The length of the sections also feel appropriate and amendable to creating smaller reading assignments for each chapter.

Organization/Structure/Flowrating:4

The text is well-organized and the subject matter flows well from one chapter to the next. I think the authors did a good job of arranging the subject matter such that the fundamental principles students need to build a chemical foundation (i.e. classification of matter, simple atomic structure, the mole concept) are presented first, but the book is still appropriately arranged in an "Atom's First" manner.

Interfacerating:2

The images/charts could be improved. For the most part, I think the images/charts/etc are appropriate and to-the-point, but lack some of the visual appeal and clarity of "conventional" texts, however, some of the images/charts seem bigger than necessary with respect to their pedagogical utility (e.g. Figure 2.28 - a spool of copper wire), some of the images/charts do not do a great job of illustrating the point unless you already understood what the point was (e.g. Figure 3.6 - a visual of constructive and destructive interference would help add context to the idea of interference in this figure), some images/charts are not well-explained or are missing critical features (Figure 3.20 - there is no label on the y axis of the graphs, nodes are not labelled, the relevance of the change in color is not discussed in depth). I love the integration of PhET simulation links/suggestions which help students dive deeper into specific concepts than conventional texts, so that is a major plus. I chose several examples from Ch. 3 because this is an atoms first text and I feel like this chapter is critical for the student's understanding.

Grammatical Errorsrating:4

I have not noticed any egregious grammatical errors.

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Cultural Relevancerating:2

While this is a chemistry text and there are clear issues with finding Nobel laureates in chemistry of various races, ethnicities, and backgrounds for specific breakthroughs in our scientific past, every portrait of a chemist in this text is white or "white-passing." There is a good balance of representation of female vs males, which is good, but it is common in science for white women to take up all of the "underrepresented" space. I think this text could benefit from diversification of examples.

Comments

Overall, this text is of sufficiently high-quality for use in undergraduate general chemistry courses. It covers all of the fundamentals of the topic and provides many excellent resources for homework problems and virtual simulations. Figures/charts, and some explanations regarding atomic structure could be improved, but overall this is a great resource for providing accessible, hyakkendana-hashigozake.com-educational resources for students. I look forward to seeing how this text progresses!