Hey guys, seems to be some knowledgeable folk here with some wonderful Q's (dat brick & mortar, drool... dat texas offset trailer... drool).

You are watching: How to get bark with a pellet smoker

I actually had a question, and thought I would ask here. Anyone around here experienced with pellet poopers? Anyone know if an AMS is a great way to improve bark production? Any other ways to improve bark? Pellet poopers (Traeger and the like) are definitely convenient, but I have found my REC-TEC to sacrifice a bit in terms of bark over my ECB.

Can it be corrected, or is one of the (few) weakness of pellet grills that you just can't solve.


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Anyone around here experienced with pellet poopers?

Been using a Traeger for 12 years...

Any other ways to improve bark?

Don't foil your meat. Finish in a very hot oven.

But most importantly: rub your meat and then let it sit in the fridge for at least eight hours before smoking. Overnight is better. When you do that the salt in the rub pulls protein-laden moisture out of the muscle fibers, that fluid mixes with the spice and sugar and salt in your rub. The fridge dries that fluid out, and given enough time you get a protein-rich, rub-flavored, sticky layer called a pellicle.

Smoke sticks to a pellicle like white sticks on rice. So you get very nice coloring and flavor. And since you've "artificially" increased the protein levels at the meat surface, you get better results from the Maillard reaction on the meat's surface at the lower temps typical in a smoker.

is one of the (few) weakness of pellet grills that you just can't solve.

Nope, get plenty of bark with my Traeger. Here are two pork shoulders I did:

Resting: http://i.imgur.com/5zQl2Vx.jpg.

Mid-pull: http://i.imgur.com/0j1iYZv.jpg

I don't really get a lot of bark on my ribs, but don't really care to. It's possible, though.

Honestly, I don't see any weakness inherent in pellet smokers. You have low, indirect heat, lots of smoke, and time. And beyond that you get very consistent temps and even levels of smoke, so pellet smokers have advantages over traditional offset or water smokers or whatever. It's nearly impossible to over-smoke something on a pellet smoker. You can't overload the chip tray at too low a temp and produce bitter food, and such.

See more: Chr Is Fit For A King A Christian Band, Fit For A King

The only downside I can see with pellet smokers is you don't get to pick what goes into the pellets. So just buy the all-hardwood and you're fine. The stuff that's like 80% and 20% hickory are OK in a pinch, though. You just aren't going to get as much hickory flavor as you would otherwise.

Can it be corrected

Rub your meat, come back 12-18 hours later. See what your pellet smoker can do then and let us know how it went!